NACCB 2018 to be hosted in Toronto, Ontario

NACCB 2018’s theme is Conservation Science, Policy, and Practice: Connecting the Urban to the Wild. NACCB2018 will be held at the Westin Harbour Castle Conference Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, from July 21-26, 2018. Planning for NACCB2018 is well under way, and we will have materials to share soon. Toronto is a diverse and exciting city which will make a great location for the 2018 meeting.

NACCB2016 Plenary Talks Now Online!

Videos of the plenary talks from NACCB2016 are now on the NACCB YouTube channel here.

Barbara Taylor’s work to save the vaquita from extinction to be honored at NACCB

Learn about vaquita conservation efforts on 60 Minutes on Sunday, May 22, 2016.

The Society for Conservation Biology (SCB) annually awards the Edward T. LaRoe III Memorial Award to an individual who has been a leader in translating principles of conservation biology into real-world conservation. Preference is given to employees of government agencies or individuals who have spent at least part of their career in public service. Dr. LaRoe was chief scientist for NOAA’s coastal zone management program, a founder and former director of the Coastal Society, and a principal author of the National Wetland Classification system. Past recipients have included leaders in a wide range of disciplines.

This year, the award will be given at the North American Congress of Conservation Biology (NACCB; www.scbnacongress.org ) held in Madison, Wisconsin from July 17 to July 20, 2016. The award will be given to Dr. Barbara Taylor of NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center to recognize her outstanding career achievements in translating conservation science into real-world conservation efforts, most recently in the case of vaquita conservation.

The vaquita (Phocoena sinus), or Gulf of California harbor porpoise, is one of the rarest and most endangered marine mammals in the world.  The vaquita, which is Spanish for “little cow”, is especially vulnerable to drowning in gillnet fishing nets. Recent surveys document that only around 60 vaquitas remain. Results of the acoustic monitoring between 2011-2015 showed an 80% decline over that period. Results from the acoustic monitoring prompted the emergency 2-year ban of gillnets that began on May 10, 2015. Although almost no gillnets were seen on the survey between October and early December, 42 illegal totoaba gillnets were recently removed by the Sea Shepherd in collaboration with the Mexican Navy. 3 vaquitas died in March from gillnet entanglement.

At 8 pm on Sunday, May 22, 2016, the program 60 Minutes will air a segment on vaquita. The crew came to San Felipe and interviewed Lorenzo Rojas-Bracho and Barbara Taylor during the 2015 vaquita survey. They also filmed the presentation of the SMM Conservation Merit Prize and interviewed Mexico’s Secretary of the Environment and Natural Resources Rafael Pacchiano afterwards in San Francisco. Most importantly, they filmed vaquita themselves. The program will be available after May 22 on http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/preview-the-last-vaquitas/

SCB, led by its Marine, Latin America and Caribbean, and Asia sections, has worked for several years to advance vaquita conservation. More information can be found on SCB’s vaquitawebpage, and via the following policy statements from 2015 and2012.

See also this video, and articles in the LA Times, and CNN.

NACCB2016 t-shirts available

Check out the t-shirt design! Available for purchase soon!

NACCBTSHIRT_edited2

Call for nominations: NACCB2016 hosts the Edward T. LaRoe Awards. Submit by April 25th! 

NACCB2016 online program is available now! 

NACCB2016 Registration Now Open!

We are excited to announce the opening of registration for the North American Congress for Conservation Biology, “Communicating Science for Conservation Biology,” hosted in Madison, WI at the Monona Terrace Community & Convention Center. Join us for a spectacular line up of events from Saturday, July 16th to Thursday, July 21st. Take a look at our schedule at a glance for the full conference schedule. Register by April 25th to receive the Early Bird rate.

NACCB2016 call for presentations is now open til Jan. 20th

The NACCB2016 call for contributed talks and poster presentations is now open until January 20!

http://www.scbnacongress.org/callforcontributedpresentations

Become a sponsor of NACCB2016!

Your organization can become a sponsor  of NACCB2016! Use our online portal to submit donations & pick your benefits!

http://www.scbnacongress.org/SponsorExhibitAdvertiseatNACCB

NACCB2016 abstract reviewers needed!

Calling all willing NACCB2016 abstract reviewers!! Complete this reviewer survey to sign up, Feb 1-15 review period:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1q6FZMToZZf-2DbAgM53_3-JRdUPZ3m-B3so4NIcCivA/viewform?edit_requested=true

Questions and Answers about NACCB2016

NACCB2016 Chair Jamie Hogberg answers questions about the upcoming conference:

What’s in store for next year’s NACCB in Madison, Wisconsin (especially for those who have never been to one)?

We have a great lineup of events and speakers for NACCB 2016, and are excited to receive proposals for symposia, workshops, and short courses. We’re focused on content related to conservation science, management, policy, and education, and this year we will especially highlight the importance of communicating science to achieve conservation goals.  We want this conference to be an open platform to grow and foster collaborative relationships among conservation professionals, journalists, researchers, and students.

Why was Wisconsin picked for the conference?

Wisconsin has deep roots in conservation, once home to pioneers like Aldo Leopold, John Muir, and Gaylord Nelson. Today, we expand on this foundation with high impact research coming from the University of Wisconsin, collaboration with communities, non-profit, and governmental partnerships to support conservation initiatives in our state, and promote the Wisconsin Idea inside and beyond state & national borders.  We have some noteworthy SCB benchmarks to celebrate in 2016 too, being 25 years since the international meeting was hosted here in Madison, and 30 years since the incorporation of SCB as a Society!

Who should come to these meetings? What is the conference’s main themes and what are you hoping to accomplish with the NACCB?

Anyone and everyone interested in learning and building networks in conservation in North America and beyond!  Many conference attendees will present on research and work from all over the globe, and we look forward to hearing from a diversity of scientists, practitioners, students, and teachers working in conservation biology.  Our theme this year is “Communicating Science for Conservation Action.” For us, that means many things, and includes identifying and advancing skills in scientific communication. How do we develop and engage with a broader and more inclusive audience? How do we promote behavior change that protects and sustains natural resources within the context of a community? How do we reach policy-makers and put positive change into action? Our theme also celebrates the longstanding SCB tradition of communicating ideas and building partnerships within the congress, around a variety of conservation-related issues. We hope to see attendees walk away feeling empowered, inspired, and ready to put new skill sets into action in their own work.

Can you give us a sneak peek into speakers, field trips and any other surprises?

I certainly can. Thanks to all for your patience as we release this info on our website and social media. It takes more than a village to plan and run a conference! A few of many highlights to look forward to include our keynote and plenary sessions that will span multiple topics and conservation disciplines, while converging on our theme of science communications, to name a few of the speakers: Dietram Scheufele, Drew Lanham, and Francis Beineke.

In addition to scientific content at the congress, we encourage folks to get here early on Saturday before the conference to enjoy the nation’s largest farmers’ market around the capitol square, one block from the conference venue, Monona Terrace.  In addition to all of the fun things to do in Madison, we’ll have field trips to the famous Aldo Leopold Shack and International Crane Foundation in the Driftless region of southwest Wisconsin, opportunities to kayak, paddle board, and canoe in Madison’s Lakes and Rivers, (not to mention sunset boat cruises just outside the conference venue), a yoga, mindfulness, and sustainability-inspired field trip, visits to the UW Arboretum (home to the world’s first restored prairie), and lots more to come!
 

NACCB 2016: Call for Proposals

Check out new information of NACCB 2016’s Call for Proposals at NACCB 2016: Call for Proposals

Call for proposals now open for SCBNA’s 2016 conference!

As scientists and practitioners working to address the conservation challenges facing the planet, we know it is not enough to engage in groundbreaking research. We also have the responsibility to communicate beyond our field in ways that inspire action, change policy, and engage diverse communities. We are faced with the challenge of developing innovative solutions to environmental and social issues that will translate across disciplines within and outside of the scientific community. The 2016 North American congress will highlight the importance of integrating successful communication strategies into our work. In order to move from research to action, we must communicate across boundaries to encourage and empower diverse communities working to sustain the Earth’s biological and cultural diversity, and to implement the policy changes that make this possible.

Through numerous plenaries, symposia, concurrent sessions, workshops, short courses and field trips, we will advance discourse in many conservation disciplines, from biological to social sciences. The 2016 congress will provide an open platform to foster collaborative partnerships, and to create and adapt emerging ideas, technologies, and methods in conservation science.

The third North American Congress for Conservation Biology will play an important role in advancing science and stimulating conservation action through effective dialogue and far-reaching engagement. This bi-annual Congress in North America is critical to our success as conservation professionals.

We are currently accepting proposals for Workshops, Short Courses, and Symposia. Proposals must be submitted by November 6, 2015.  The call for abstracts will go out this fall, open for submissions in November. Conference registration will open in early winter.

Visit our website and find out more about the meeting and the location. Please stay tuned as we update the site with details on the congress. We have blocks of rooms booked at local hotels that are walking, bussing, and biking distance to the meeting and downtown. For those on a tighter budget, we will have dorm options available until filled.  UW-Madison dorms are also a short walk, bus, or bike ride away from the Monona Community and Convention Center, where the conference will be held.

Wisconsin living in the summertime is tough to beat. Plan to spend some extra time here and see our state’s plethora of parks, state natural areas, and summer time traditions. To learn more about the meeting please visit the NACCB 2016 website at www.scbnacongress.org.

The Monona Conference Center in Madison, Wisconsin.

The Monona Conference Center in Madison, Wisconsin.

NACCB Meeting in Madison, WI

The Wisconsin Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology will be the host of the 2016 SCBNA meeting:

NACCB Meeting in Madison, WI! | Wisconsin Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology.

2014 NACCB meeting in Missoula, MT

Updates from the Local Organizing Committee in Madison, WI:

As the snow flies and the wind blows in on us from Lake Monona and Mendota here in Madison, Wi, we are very excited by the thought of this warm-weather conference coming our way in July! (2016, that is)..

We are close to finalizing venue selection at the beautiful Monona Terrace Convention Center, designed to be a “dream civic center” by architect Frank Lloyd Wright in 1938, connecting Madison’s capital square to the shore of Lake Monona. We look forward to sharing this space with you all!

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