The webinar recording for the sixth in the 2021 SCBNA Student Affairs Webinar Series is now available on the SCB North America YouTube Page. In the sixth installment of the SCBNA 2021 Student Affairs Webinar Series, panelists discussed the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion in conservation practice and research. We are grateful to the following panelists for sharing their research and experiences with us in this webinar: Sheena Talma, Science Programme Manager of Nekton Foundation, and Dr. Paris Stefanoudis, Marine Biologist at the University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation.

Many thanks to the Student Affairs Subcommittee for organizing this wonderful webinar series. All of the recordings in the series are up on the SCB North America YouTube page.

2021 Student Affairs Webinar Series
SCB North America’s Student Affairs Committee is hosting a 2021 webinar series on topics of interest to conservation students, early-career professionals, and others!

The sixth webinar in the series is:

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Conservation Practice & Research

Tuesday, September 21, 2021

7-8 am PT | 10-11 am ET

Join us as we discuss the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion in conservation practice and research with Sheena Talma, Science Programme Manager of Nekton Foundation, and Dr. Paris Stefanoudis, Marine Biologist at the University of Oxford and Nekton Foundation.

Registration is required, please register at this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUoceCqpjstE9IjZkpDH77kPDWnNe5DiE9M

Webinars are available to both SCB members and non-members. Webinars will be recorded and posted to the SCBNA YouTube Page – subscribe so you are notified when new recordings are posted! The first five webinar recordings are now available:

Please contact megan.keville@scbnorthamerica.org with any questions related to the webinar series.

Call for Proposals Is Now Open – Deadline November 5, 2021

Organize your own session for NACCB 2022, taking place July 16-21 at the Silver Legacy in downtown Reno, Nevada.

View criteria and instructions for submitting your workshop, short course, symposium, or interactive session proposal at https://scbnorthamerica.org/index.php/2022-call-for-proposals/. We welcome session proposals of all types that relate to the meeting theme, including and not limited to topics in indigenous-led conservation, early-mid career professional development, education, climate change, human dimensions of conservation, community science, policy, and diversity in conservation leadership.

The Scientific Program will take place July 18 – 20, 2022. Workshops & Short Courses will primarily take place July 16, 17, and 21, 2022, with limited availability for short lunchtime sessions during the Scientific Program.

The SCBNA board and staff are pleased to offer a remote, part-time, 6-month (with option to extend to 12 months) paid communications internship with our Communications Committee. The aim of this position is to increase SCBNA’s capacity to communicate and interact with members and potential members. We seek applicants who have experience and/or education in communications, writing, social media, and/or marketing, as well as education or training in ecology and/or conservation biology. The successful candidate is expected to provide support on SCBNA’s social media accounts, as well as seek new and innovative ways to reach and interact with our diverse membership. Desired content across communication platforms will include updates and announcements, information about our biennial conference, the North American Congress of Conservation Biology (NACCB), and general conservation news and storytelling. The successful applicant may also assist with other communications outreach, such as e-newsletters and website content. Candidates who have experience in updating website content are highly desired. The intern will regularly interact with and gauge the online/communications needs of SCBNA members, will report directly to the Communications Committee Chair  and Director of Operations, and may collaborate with other Communications Committee members. Regular meetings and communications with these parties will be required. 

DESIRED QUALIFICATIONS:  

  • Knowledge and experience with digital communication tools, including social media platforms 
  • Interest, education, and/or training in ecology and conservation biology 
  • Strong written and verbal communication skills 
  • Experience with graphic design, photography, and web-based design programs 
  • Creativity in communicating content in effective and unique ways 
  • Commitment to and experience with Diversity, Equity & Inclusion initiatives in conservation or related fields

TIME COMMITMENT: Five (5) to eight (8) hours a week for six (6) months with an option to extend to twelve (12) months with target start date in October 2021

COMPENSATION: $20 an hour, estimated 5-8 hours per week  

APPLICATION PROCEDURE: Applicants should submit the following application materials electronically in a single pdf document to be considered for this position: Resume, cover letter, and names and contact information for two (2) references.  

To apply, please email your application to Communications Committee Chair, Lauren Jonaitis, jonaitislauren@gmail.com.

Review of applications will begin September 13, 2021. Applications will be considered until the position is filled. Inquiries about the position should be directed via email to Lauren Jonaitis. The anticipated approximate start date for the internship is October 2021.

SCBNA is committed to increasing equity and inclusion within the field of conservation biology and in its board and staff members. To this end, SCBNA has an Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Officer on the board and an Equity, Inclusion, and Diversity Committee. We offer grants to attend congresses, follow best practices in conference  design (including such things as gender neutral bathrooms, providing a private place for nursing or other needs, providing sign language interpreters, etc.), run sessions on equity and inclusion at congresses, and are currently working on an Allyship program to increase the effectiveness of allies in addressing equity issues in the field of conservation. We recognize that this work will never be complete and we are committed to continually evaluating and improving our equity and inclusion work. 

SCBNA is an Equal Opportunity Employer advancing inclusive excellence. All qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age, protected veteran status, or other protected categories. 

The Hawaiʻi Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology (HISCB) organized “Restoring the Mind & Body Through Aloha ʻĀina,” a series of four volunteer workdays from March through May 2021. Forty-six volunteers worked to make improvements to the local wetland and coastal areas and were given the opportunity to restore mental well-being through the natural environment, connect with like-minded individuals, and learn to identify native and invasive species.

The volunteer activities, which included removing invasive plants, out-planting native species, and mulching, benefited two local community-based conservation organizations, Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi and Mālama Loko Ea. Kākoʻo ʻŌiwi focuses on restoring agricultural and ecological productivity to wetlands on the island of Oʻahu and promoting the social and economic advancement of the local community. Mālama Loko Ea focuses on the restoration of Loko Ea, a 400-year-old loko i’a (fishpond) in Hale’iwa, Hawai’i.

To learn more about the Hawai’i Chapter and get involved with upcoming events, visit their website and follow them on Facebook or Twitter. To find a chapter near you or learn about starting your own chapter, visit the North America Chapters website.

The webinar recording for the fifth in the 2021 SCBNA Student Affairs Webinar Series is now available on the SCB North America YouTube Page. Incorporating social science into practice and research is vital for improving conservation outcomes. In the fifth installment of the SCBNA 2021 Student Affairs Webinar Series, panelists discussed the intersection of conservation and social science. We are grateful to the following panelists for sharing their research and experiences with us in this webinar: Dr. Arundhati Jagadish, Social Scientist at Conservation International, and Dr. Meredith Gore, Conservation Social Scientist at the University of Maryland.

This was the final webinar before a summer break in the series. Many thanks to the Student Affairs Subcommittee for organizing this wonderful webinar series. All of the recordings in the series are up on the SCB North America YouTube page.

Planning is underway for a fall webinar on Equity and Inclusion in Conservation and Research – stay tuned for more information over the summer!

Members of the policy committee of the Hawai’i Chapter of the Society for Conservation Biology (HISCB) have submitted a policy statement on behalf of HISCB and the Society for Conservation Biology Oceania section regarding the listing of at-risk Hawaiian terrestrial flora and fauna species under the State Endangered Species Statute, HRS 195D, to prevent further decline or extinction.

Despite its relatively small landmass (less than 0.2% of total US landmass), Hawai’i has been called the endangered species capital of the world; it is home to more than 500 of the 1,600 species listed as endangered or threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. However, Hawai’i receives only 8-10% of federal funding appropriated for the recovery of endangered or threatened species. Furthermore, the federal Endangered Species Act has been weakened by recent amendments and revisions made during the Trump Administration. With decreased protections for vulnerable species at the federal level, HISCB asserts that now is the time for state governments to strengthen their protections. 

Hawai’i has its own endangered species list under the State Endangered Species Statute, HRS 195D, to which any federally listed endangered or threatened species are automatically added. While many states add additional species to their own lists, Hawai’i has added only two species beyond those federally listed. According to nationally- or internationally-based conservation organizations, as of April 2020 there are over 600 additional Hawaiian species that are not listed but are considered endangered or imperiled. Listing species at highest risk under the State ESA, HRS 195D, would raise the profile of these overlooked species and promote their protection.

In its policy statement, HISCB has proposed three clear priorities that can be viewed as first steps to enhance the protection of Hawaiʻi’s unique biodiversity:

  1. Department of Land and Natural Resources (DLNR), the State agency that is charged with overseeing the State Endangered Species List, initiates the State listing process for at-risk Hawaiian flora and fauna species under the State Endangered Species Statute, HRS 195D, to prevent further decline or extinction,
  2. DLNR convenes workshops and other collaborative activities with relevant biologists to further evaluate the classifications of NatureServe and IUCN or other relevant analyses of Hawaiʻi species and consider them for state listing, and 
  3. Identify and engage interested individuals and organizations to petition the State for species’ listings in lieu of action by DLNR through the described process above.

Read the full statement here.

Scientific integrity is central to the mission and vision of SCBNA, and efforts by the Trump administration to undermine the integrity of science around the Covid 19 pandemic has prompted members of Congress and the Biden administration to take much-needed action on this issue. In March, SCB North America and fourteen other organizations signed a letter urging the House Science, Space and Technology Committee to support the Scientific Integrity Act. Reintroduced in February 2021, the Act would ensure scientists can carry out their research—and communicate it with the public—without fear of political pressure or retaliation. The Act requires that scientific conclusions are independent of political considerations or ideology. In addition, it would prohibit political appointees from manipulating scientific findings, or impeding the release and communication of those findings to the public through scientific journals or the media. Open The Government led the effort to bring the letter before the House committee, working alongside a coalition of science, conservation, research and accountability organizations.

Since taking office in January, President Biden has signaled a shift in federal government policy, creating a plan to strengthen scientific integrity and releasing an executive order to support science in policy-making (see this and other Executive Actions supported by SCB North America here). Action from Congress in passing the Scientific Integrity Act would establish a number of essential protections and policies that would stay in place through shifting presidential administrations and political appointees. SCB North America is encouraged by the re-emergence of scientific integrity as a high priority under the new administration and Congress, and looks forward to continuing to prioritize this issue through its policy program. 

Through the work of its policy committee and members, SCB North America has long supported efforts to strengthen scientific integrity to ensure that the best available science is used to inform conservation actions and policies. The SCB North America Policy program (SNAP) focuses on this work, making progress through advocacy, policy recommendations, and fostering international communication by scientists. This work promotes biodiversity by making sure that conservation laws, from environmental impact assessments to forest and marine resource management, are implemented using the best possible science. 

Download and read the full letter to the House Science, Space and Technology Committee here.

2021 Student Affairs Webinar Series
SCB North America’s Student Affairs Committee is hosting a 2021 webinar series on topics of interest to conservation students, early-career professionals, and others!

The fifth webinar in the monthly series is:

Conservation and Social Science: Harnessing Interdisciplinary Methods for Complex Issues

Wednesday, May 26

12-1:00pm PT | 3-4:00pm ET

Incorporating social science into practice and research is vital for improving conservation outcomes.

Join us as we discuss the intersection of conservation and social science with Dr. Arundhati Jagadish, Social Scientist at Conservation International, and Dr. Meredith Gore, Conservation Social Scientist at the University of Maryland.

Registration is required, please register at this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUoceCqpjstE9IjZkpDH77kPDWnNe5DiE9M

Webinars are available to both SCB members and non-members. Webinars will be recorded and posted to the SCBNA YouTube Page – subscribe so you are notified when new recordings are posted! The first three webinar recordings are now available:

Please contact megan.keville@scbnorthamerica.org with any questions related to the webinar series.

tan image with light and dark blue text that reads: Society for Conservation Biology North America 2021 Student Affairs Webinar Series: Multiple Ways of Knowing in Conservation and Ecology, May 13, 2021, 12-1:30pm PT | 3-4:30pm ET. Under text are four photos of webinar speakers out in the field.

2021 Student Affairs Webinar Series
SCB North America’s Student Affairs Committee is hosting a 2021 webinar series on topics of interest to conservation students, early-career professionals, and others!

The fourth webinar in the monthly series is:

Multiple Ways of Knowing in Conservation and Ecology

Thursday, May 13

12-1:30pm PT | 3-4:30pm ET

Ecosystems have been occupied, managed, & conserved since time immemorial. Pairing Indigenous Knowledge with western science, each with their own integrity, can allow for a more comprehensive view of ecosystem changes and species interactions.

Join us as we discuss key concepts and case studies with (left to right in image above) Dr. Lynn Lee, Marine Ecologist, and Niisii Guujaaw, Resource Conservation Biologist, at Gwaii Haanas National Marine Conservation Area Reserve and Haida Heritage Site, Dr. Sonia Ibarra, Coordinator for the Tamamta Program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Dr. Andrea Reid, PI. at the University of British Columbia Centre for Indigenous Fisheries

Registration is required, please register at this link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZcqdOqqrjIjE92xfutWrPVrMDLHprgv5c3J

Webinars are available to both SCB members and non-members. Webinars will be recorded and posted to the SCBNA YouTube Page – subscribe so you are notified when new recordings are posted! The first three webinar recordings are now available:


This is the fourth in our series of monthly webinars; stay tuned for more!

Please contact megan.keville@scbnorthamerica.org with any questions related to the webinar series.